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Brazil's president Dilma Rousseff is impeached by Brazilian senate, but Brazilian corruption stays in office.

August 31, 2016

Brazil's Senate has voted to remove President Dilma Rousseff from office for manipulating the budget.
 

It puts an end to 13 years in power of her left-wing Workers' Party.
 

Sixty-one senators voted in favour of her impeachment and 20 against, meeting the two-thirds majority needed to remove her from the presidency.

In a separate vote, the senate voted 42 to 36 not to bar Rousseff from public office for eight years.

Rousseff wasn't accused of of any personal corruption allegations, but her opponents said she should be impeached because her administration covered up the state budget gaps with money from government banks and for frontloading funds for government social programmes and issuing spending budget decrees without congressional approval ahead of her reelection in 2014.

She has denied any wrongdoing. She and her supporters repeatedly denounced the impeachment attempt as “a coup” tantamount to an interruption of Brazilian democracy, which was restored in 1985 after 21 years of military rule.


But if anyone thinks that this will put an end to corruption in Brazils' politics, they better think again.

Michel Temer, Brazil's vice president, who replaced President Dilma Rousseff , will also face impeachment proceedings on the same charges as President Dilma's.

Temer, a senior member of the Brazilian Democratic Movement party, is being accused of breaking governments fiscal rules, the same charge that got President Dilma suspended and facing an impeachment trial.

But the corruption does not stop there; out of Brazil's 594 members of Congress, 352 — about 60 percent — are under investigation or facing charges for corruption and other serious crimes.

And if all of this isn't enough, Brazil is approaching its worst recession since 1901, a fact that is also blamed by the opposition on Dilma and on her mismanagement of the Brazilian economy.

 

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